All posts tagged: left

re: Left fragmentation in USA, circa 1968-present (rough notes for future writing)

And I’m back to posting very rough notes… (1) Conceptual shift over past half century from civic/political framework to hobby/elective framework (i.e. “activism”). (2) In concert with broader cultural and structural shift away from “the commons”, toward individualism. (3) The implosion and fragmentation of the Left in the early 1970s. (4) Consolidation of radicals across issues. (5) Marriage of radical remnant and counter-culture. (6) Narration of a common radical constellation of shared meanings and reference points. (7) Signaling behavior oriented toward the center of the radical constellation. (8) Alienation of radicals from broader social bases. (9) Normalization, institutionalization, and ritualized performance of this alienation. Not to mention the role of non-profit organizations in relation to entrepreneurial framework, self-selection, marginal differentiation, and fragmentation.

“Counter-hegemony” and Left Ambivalence Toward Power

I’m reading Cihan Tuğal’s Passive Revolution: Absorbing the Islamic Challenge to Capitalism. I’m still working my way through it, but so far I’ve found it very insightful. There are so many things in the book that I’m looking forward to digging into, so I feel a little bad that I’m about to start with the one thing that I’m ambivalent about: Tuğal’s use of the term counter-hegemony. I’m not usually one to nitpick about terms—especially esoteric terms like counter-hegemony—but here I go… Dr. Tuğal did not invent the term, of course. Moreover, I suspect that because I agree so much with his descriptions and assessments (of patterns of political engagement, in the case of Islamist movements in Turkey), it stands out all the more when I do take issue with something. His book has got me thinking more specifically about what I don’t like about the term generally. To be clear, I introduce his work here as a jumping off point for this blog post, rather than as the object of my critique. Here’s my …